Frequently asked questions regarding the implementation of the France-Canada Youth Mobility

You will find below answers to frequently asked questions regarding the implementation of the France-Canada Youth Mobility Agreement of March 14, 2013

1- VISA

Where should I submit my visa application?

Canadian citizens residing abroad can apply for a long stay visa under the Mobility Agreement at any French consular office with the authority to issue visas. The application must be started on the France Visas website (https://france-visas.gouv.fr/). Depending on your place of residence, your application must then be submitted to:

  • The visa application centre (as is the case in Canada);
  • Your local French consular office, if there is no visa application centre.

Do I need to give fingerprints (biometrics) when applying for a visa?

Yes, you must go in person to a French consular office or a visa application centre (VFS in Canada) to have your digital fingerprints taken when applying for any type of visa under the Mobility Agreement.

Do I need to provide a cover letter when applying for a young professional visa?

No, Canadian citizens are not required to provide a cover letter when applying for a young professional visa.

Do I need to submit a CERFA form when applying for a young professional visa?

Yes, young professionals are required to submit CERFA form #15187*02 Work Permit Application for Foreign Employee Residing Outside France filled out and signed by the employer in France. This document will be certified by the Consulate (the form can be found at: https://www.formulaires.modernisation.gouv.fr/gf/cerfa_15187.do).

Do I need to provide a cover letter when applying for a working holiday visa? Is there is a specific format?

Yes, you must submit a cover letter when applying for a working holiday visa. It must be submitted on a separate sheet of paper, but there is no specific format.

Do I need to provide a certificate from the Department of Veterans Affairs Canada when applying for a visa for a youth traveling to Vimy or Juno Beach?

No, a certificate from the Department of Veterans Affairs Canada is no longer required. However, an employment contract (CERFA #15187*02) signed with Centre Juno Beach is required.

How much funds do Canadian youth applicants need in order to be eligible under the 2013 Agreement?

Applicants must be able to show sufficient funds (2,500 euros in total) for the first part of their stay and for a return ticket.

In which territories is a visa valid under the 2013 Agreement?

The visa is valid in:

  • Metropolitan France
  • Guadeloupe
  • Guiana
  • Martinique
  • Reunion Island
  • Mayotte
  • Saint-Pierre et Miquelon.

For more information regarding required documents, please visit the following links: https://ca.ambafrance.org/ExperienceFranceFr - https://france-visas.gouv.fr/web/ca/dispositions-locales

What is the processing time for visa applications under the Mobility Agreement?

The processing time for visa applications submitted under the Agreement is approximately 7 business days, or up to 15 business days during the summer (June to August) and in the fall (November to December). The application can be submitted up to three months prior to the planned date of departure.

How long are visas valid for under the Agreement?

A visa is valid for the duration indicated on the visa sticker. It is valid starting on the date indicated on the sticker (usually the planned date of arrival in France), rather than on the actual date of entry into France.

Am I able to travel within the Schengen Area with a visa issued under the Agreement?

Yes, a visa issued under the Agreement allows you to travel and stay within the Schengen Area for periods of up to 90 days, for a total period not exceeding 180 days.

Young professionals, interns and students must have their visa validated online within three months of arriving in France at the following website: https://administration-etrangers-en-france.interieur.gouv.fr/particuliers/#/

Lastly, you must also comply with the requirements set out in Article 6 of the Schengen Borders Code which states that you must provide a border guard with the following:

  • A valid travel document with a D visa (valid for more than three months after the date you plan on leaving France),
  • The purpose and details of your planned visit,
  • Proof of sufficient funds to provide for yourself for the duration of the planned trip.

What age limit is imposed under the 2013 France-Canada Agreement?

Canadian citizens must be aged 35 years old or less on the day the application is submitted to the French Consulate. They may therefore submit an application up until the day before turning 36.

If at the end of their first 12 months on French soil they wish to extend their stay, they will be able to request an extension at their local Prefecture even if, in the meantime, they have turned 36.

2- PROCEDURES TO FOLLOW IN FRANCE

What procedures must young professionals follow with OFII?

Upon arrival in France, you or your employer must mail the following documents to your local OFII office: application for an OFII certificate and the CERFA document signed by the consular office before the day of departure (the CERFA document can be found at: https://www.formulaires.modernisation.gouv.fr/gf/cerfa_15187.do).

A notice of receipt is then sent along with a notice of appointment for a medical visit, a requirement for a long stay visa valid as residence permit (VLS-TS).

Young professionals must have their VLS-TS validated within three months of arriving in France. They must declare their date of entry into France as well as their place of residence online at https://administration-etrangers-en-france.interieur.gouv.fr/particuliers/#/

As a young professional, will I need to pay a tax for my first residence permit?

No, but the employer is responsible for paying an “employer” tax of 72 euros for the first visa application.

Must the employment contract and internship agreement be signed by DIRECCTE?

The Agreement does not require any document to be signed by DIRECCTE.

Canadian citizens are exempt from the work permit requirement for their visit to France under this Agreement.

Are working holiday visa holders allowed to work?

Yes, they can work in order to supplement their funds during their stay in France; however, work must not be the main purpose of the visit. Other visas and permits are to be used for this purpose. When applying for a permit renewal at the local Prefecture when the first year comes to an end, working holiday visa holders are not required to provide an employment contract if they have one. They can submit an employment contract as proof of sufficient funds, but they can also do so through other means (such as by submitting a bank statement).

Where can I apply to renew my permit if I have moved?

The local Prefecture of your current place of residence (Article R. 311-10 of the Code of Entry and Visit of Foreigners and the Right of Asylum – CESEDA).

Can I apply for a different visa when renewing my residence permit?

Extension after a stay as a student
Student VLS/TS holders will be able to apply for an extension:
  • As an intern within the 12 month limit set out in the Agreement (temporary residence permit for interns must be issued);
  • As a young professional (temporary residence permit for temporary workers must be issued);
  • As a working holiday visa holder (temporary residence permit authorizing them to work must be issued).

Extension after a first stay as an intern
Intern VLS/TS holders will be able to apply for an extension:

  • As a student within the 12 month limit set out in the Agreement (a temporary permit for students must be issued);
  • As a young professional (a temporary permit for temporary workers must be issued);
  • As a working holiday visa holder (a temporary residence permit authorizing them to work must be delivered).
Extension after a first visit as a young professional or under the Working Holiday Program
Young professionals holding a VLS/TS for temporary workers and VLS-T working holiday visa holders will be able to apply for an extension:
  • As a young professional (a temporary permit for temporary workers must be issued);
  • As a working holiday visa holder (a temporary residence permit authorizing them to work must be issued);
  • As a student (a temporary permit for students must be issued);
  • As an intern (a temporary permit for interns must be issued).

When should I submit my renewal application?

In order to extend a stay under any category, an application must be submitted to the appropriate Prefecture at least two months before the current permit expires (CESEDA Article R. 311-2, number 4).

When renewing a working holiday visa, the Prefecture will arrange a second appointment closer to the expiration date. On this date, a temporary residence permit (APS) will be issued for a maximum period of 12 months.

What is the maximum length of stay authorized under the Agreement?

The combined maximum length of stay on French soil under the Agreement is 36 months, if one of these stays involves studies or an internship.

As a young Canadian, you can complete up to two stays as a young professional or with a working holiday visa for a combined total of 24 months (consecutive or non-consecutive). At the end of these 24 months, you can stay in France with a student or intern visa. However, after a stay as a student, you can extend your stay by 12 months as an intern followed by 12 months as a young professional or working holiday visa holder, which brings the maximum length of stay to 36 months.

Under this Agreement, you can stay for up to 12 months as a student and up to 12 months as an intern. You may not stay 24 months as a student or 24 months as an intern. However, after a stay as a student, you can then stay as an intern for 12 months and then another 12 months as a young professional or working holiday visa holder, bringing the maximum length of stay to 36 months.

Likewise, after a stay as an intern, you can extend your stay by 12 months as a student followed by 12 months as a young professional or working holiday visa holder, bringing the maximum length of stay to 36 months.

These stays may be continuous or not, and can be done in any order.

At the end of those 36 days, you must leave France. Once back in your home country, you can apply for the proper visa to match the purpose of your new trip to France.

As a working holiday visa holder, what should I do in case of loss or theft of passport?

You must go to your local Prefecture to request a temporary residence permit (APS) allowing you to work. This APS is renewable provided that the conditions set out in the Agreement are met, including the maximum length of stay.

3- ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS

How do I apply for social security?

You can find the up-to-date information at the following link: https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/N19811 (not applicable to working holiday visa holders).

Working holiday visa applicants must have private insurance to cover illness, pregnancy, disability, hospitalization and repatriation. Additionally, working holiday visa holders are not covered by France’s national health insurance, even if they are employed.

If they are employed, their employment contract must be registered with the competent authorities. This must be done by the employer.

Can I enroll with Pôle Emploi?

Only young professionals with a temporary residence permit (CST) for temporary workers can enroll with Pôle Emploi, provided that the employment contract has prematurely been terminated by the employer, on grounds not directly attributable to the young professional, or in special circumstances.

Working holiday visa holders, interns and students may not enroll with Pôle Emploi (Article R. 5221-48 number 5 of the Labour Code). Nevertheless, they can access public job postings at the agency or on the website.

Is income earned in France taxable in France under the Agreement?

All employees in France must file their income taxes and must pay taxes on their income in France. The foreign citizen must provide proof of having paid all taxes when leaving France.

Is it possible to drive in France with a Canadian driver’s license?

Any driver’s license legally issued in Canada is valid in France for 12 months from the date the VLS-TS is validated. Additionally, if the Canadian citizen wishes to stay in France beyond this period of 12 months, they are required to trade in their license for a French driver’s license within 12 months of arriving in France, if an agreement exists between France and the Canadian province from which the license was issued (a list can be found on the following website: https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F1460). They may trade in their French license for a Canadian license upon returning to Canada, subject to regulations which exist in the Canadian province.

For Canadian student permit holders, a Canadian driver’s license is valid for the duration of the stay in France.

Last modified on 01/10/2019

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